Booster’s costume creator: it’s a scream!

It’s officially October, and that means it’s time for putting up spooky decorations, carving pumpkins, and best of all—dressing up in costumes. Deciding on a costume can be downright scary when there are so many options to choose from, so we invite you to try Booster’s Costume Creator.

This interactive site will allow you to try several costumes and see which one works best for you. And because it’s both fun and educational, you can dress up Imagine Learning characters in fun costumes, both hysterical and historical. Learn about Cleopatra, Blackbeard, or Einstein as you craft your creepy creation. Choose a background, pick a message, and then witch your friends a happy Halloween by sending your masterpiece to them as an e-card.

Here’s how Booster’s Costume Creator works:

1. Pick a Person. Always wanted to be a brilliant scientist? Fond of famous pilots? With Booster’s Costume Creator, you have your choice of dressing up as a pirate, a vampire, an emperor, or several other options.

2. Choose a Costume. Want to add Shakespeare’s puffy shirt with Blackbeard’s silly pantaloons? No problem. Using three interchangeable panels, you can easily mix and match your favorite items from each character’s outfit plus a unique background to create a truly spook-tacular costume! You can even click the info buttons to learn about each character—from fearsome Blackbeard the pirate to disappearing pilot Amelia Earhart.

3. Share … and Scare! Now that you’ve picked the perfect costume, it’s time to scare somebody with it. Email an e-card of your boo-tiful character to friends and family, or simply print it off and hang it up somewhere. It’s a scream come true!

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We’re head over heels for Booster’s Valentine Creator

Share the love with your friends and family by using Booster’s Valentine Creator.

Booster’s Valentine Creator is an interactive webpage that helps you create customized valentines—all with just a few clicks of the mouse.

Here’s how to put a little pizzazz into your valentines this year:

Choose a character. All the Imagine Learning stars are here, from loveable Pete the Prairie Dog to chatterbox Mike the Microphone.

Select a colorful background. Roses are red and violets are blue; we’ve got a color that’s perfect for you.

Pick a memorable message. Using the arrows above the card, select the perfect sentiment.

Once you’ve completed your creation, download and print it, or email it to a lucky recipient.

Teachers, be sure to share the love with your class, as they will be absolutely smitten by this fun, interactive activity. So put some heart into it and make a sweet valentine for that special someone.

Happy Valentine’s Day from all your friends at Imagine Learning!

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Free webinar this Tuesday, February 14: Helping long-term English learners

Do you know what long-term English learners need? Listen in as presenter Lily Wong Fillmore addresses key questions related to this growing group of students who rarely receive the support they need to attain true proficiency and succeed in secondary grades.

In this webinar, you’ll learn why so many English learners appear to stall in their efforts to learn English as a second language. You’ll also learn how to use academic English instruction and the right kind of instructional support to help long-term English learners overcome obstacles and reach proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking. Don’t miss your chance to find out what you can do to help your long-term English learners find success–register today.

Date: Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Time: 2:00-3:00 p.m. MST

Presenter: Lily Wong Fillmore, Professor of Education Emerita at University of California, Berkeley

 

 

 

About the presenter:

Lily Wong Fillmore, Jerome A. Hutto Professor of Education Emerita at University of California, Berkeley, is a linguist and educator whose scholarship focuses on the education of language minority students. Dr. Fillmore has studied social and cognitive processes in language learning, cultural differences in language learning behavior, and primary language retention and loss. Her present research efforts focus on how academic English instruction can help teachers support students’ literacy development.

 

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