Study: students see 36-65% greater gains with Imagine Learning

SEG Study Executive Summary

SEG Measurement, an independent research firm, announced the completion of the first phase of a study of nearly 1,000 English language learners in grades two–five in a large California school district. Study results demonstrate that students in programs using Imagine Learning’s curriculum show greater improvement in reading than students not exposed to Imagine Learning software.

The study compared growth in reading skills of students who used Imagine Learning to comparable students who did not use Imagine Learning. Students used the Imagine Learning software for approximately six months between December 2012 and June 2013. Students in second grade using Imagine Learning showed 36% greater gains in reading than students who did not use the program. Imagine Learning students in grades three–five showed 65% greater gains in reading than non-users.

“Students using Imagine Learning showed statistically significant gains in reading skills and outperformed students who did not use Imagine Learning,” said Scott Elliot, president of SEG Measurement. “These findings are particularly important, given that students only used Imagine learning for half of the school year. More extended use of Imagine Learning may yield even greater gains for the students.”

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New Action Areas tool allows for immediate intervention

Imagine Learning version 13 includes the new Action Areas tool—giving teachers the intervention resources they have been asking for. The new tool assists teachers by identifying which students need help and pinpointing the skills that are giving them trouble.

Instant Data Equals Instant Intervention

The Action Areas tool allows for immediate intervention by grouping students together according to their needs. The tool provides a wealth of supporting content that can be used for guided practice. And teachers can instantly launch Imagine Learning activities and printouts directly from the tool itself. Read more »

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Somali first-language support added

Imagine Learning recently introduced Somali first-language support. The new addition makes it easier for even more students to gain language and literacy fluency.

As students use Imagine Learning and become more proficient in English, the language support gradually fades, preparing students for English-only environments.

Imagine Learning now offers first-language support in 15 languages: Spanish, Portuguese, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Vietnamese, Mandarin, Japanese, Arabic, Russian, Marshallese, Tagalog, Cantonese, Hmong, and Somali.

Somali language support is just one of the many features included in the latest update, Imagine Learning version 13. Packed with new curriculum, iPad delivery, and the new Action Areas tool, version 13 provides language and literacy instruction better than ever.

Watch the v13 video.

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Imagine Learning all-new for iPad

Imagine Learning has released an all-new iPad app designed to teach early literacy skills, and features new activities specifically optimized for touchscreen use.

Putting early literacy right at your students’ fingertips

Imagine Learning is placing early literacy into the hands of students with the all-new app, Imagine Learning for iPad. The new app from Imagine Learning features rich media content and rigorous activities that have been specifically designed to help emergent readers. Imagine Learning for iPad takes core literacy components of Imagine Learning that schools have already used successfully, and puts them into the new format teachers have been asking for. Read more »

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5 ways to fit Common Core into your curriculum

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Adjusting your curriculum to address Common Core standards is not easy. According to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania, the Common Core standards are substantially different from previous state standards, not only in curriculum but in the cognitive skills they demand. Common Core focuses on higher order skills, like “understanding and analyzing written material,” rather than “memorization and performing procedures.” To help with these higher order skills, take a look at five ways Imagine Learning can bring the Common Core into your classroom curriculum.

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